5 Reasons Kahoot & Infuse Learning are the Perfect Formative Assessment Pair

Formative assessment word cloudThis week we (myself and the elementary instructional technology coach in my district) are leading a number of educational technology PD sessions about many different topics for teachers to attend before going back to school.  The more I interact with some of these tools, the more I really love and swear by them to be used by any age or subject area.  Two of the tools I’m teaching this week, Kahoot and Infuse Learning, make a perfect formative assessment pair. I just had to share them!

Kahoot turns your normal questions into a fun, interactive game that kids of all ages really do love to play! It is similar to the trivia game at BW3’s; the quicker you answer the question correctly, the more points you are assigned.  To see Kahoot in action with students, watch the short video below.

Infuse Learning can be used on the fly for a number of quick questions throughout a lessons or you can save and distribute quizzes. Question options include students’ drawings, multiple choice, true/false, extended response, Lickert scale and more.  For a quick overview of Infuse Learning, watch the video below.

Below are the following 5 reasons I think these tools are fabulous and realistic formative assessment tools.

  1. Instant access to detailed results– No need to collect a bunch of papers, take the time to grade every students’ response, put the results in a spreadsheet and analyze the results yourself, and the other timely things teachers have to do to get meaningful information about students’ progress with more traditional classroom techniques. Kahoot gives you a break down of how many students responded with each answer choice after each question, allowing the teacher to address any common misconceptions on the spot. At the end of every Kahoot game, the teacher can download the results.  The results will tell you how long each student took to answer each question, their response, how many students responded correctly and incorrectly to each question and more.
    Infuse Learning results essentially tell you the same thing when you save students’ responses.  When using the quick assessment tools, you can quickly save the results to the results section and keep moving so your teaching isn’t interrupted. Being able to look at students’ responses as they come in allows you to address any errors or misconceptions on the spot.
  2. Kids are engaged and interested– I’ve seen kids at the high school level and at the grade school level have a blast with Kahoot. They will be begging you to play the game again, so they can increase their score and beat their classmates next time. If you don’t go over an explanation of the correct answers with them right away, kids will be looking up the answers on their own in between rounds of playing the game to improve their score.  The time limit keeps kids on their toes and prevents them from looking up answers as they go.  Kids enjoy Kahoot, so they stay engaged with the game, and ultimately the content.
    When using the quick assessment tools in Infuse Learning throughout a lesson, students must be following along and paying attention in order to answer.  The teacher can see the student’s responses, so it is clear who is paying attention and who may be daydreaming in the back.  The teacher can also see who has responded and who has not responded to any question, so no student can get out of answering a question.
  3. Simple to set up and navigate the teacher’s side– What teacher has time to learn another complicated tool or software?  The easier the better when it comes to saving time, and these two tools couldn’t be easier to navigate and set up. Since it shouldn’t take an overwhelming amount of time to get your quizzes set up in these tools, teachers will be more likely to use them on a daily/weekly basis.
  4. Students (or participants) don’t need to have an account & password- they will just need the room pin number provided by each site once you are logged in as the teacher.
  5. Will work on any device- this makes these tools useful in any setting: BYO, 1:1or checking out labs/carts.

So how do they go together? I would use Infuse Learning in my classroom on (almost) a daily basis to establish a routine with students (you can also import class lists and use Infuse Learning to take attendance based on students “entering” your class) and keep my lessons interactive. I would try to use the quiz feature to set up exit slips as frequently as I could.  Kahoot would come into play in my classroom for review sessions before tests and to check understanding for more complicated or dull topics that need a little spicing up to keep students interested.

What are your favorite formative assessment tools to use in todays classroom? What do you think of Kahoot and Infuse Learning?

Tech To You Later!
-Katie

5 Edtech Tools in 5 Minutes: Episode 5

With our school-wide Digital Citizenship Day, February was a little crazy and I never got around to making a 5 in 5 episode for February. Now that things have calmed down, I can resume making the monthly 5 in 5 screencasts, which highlight 5 edtech tools teachers can use with students in 5 minutes (okay you caught me-less than six minutes!). By no means are these five minute episodes a comprehensive overview of the tools, but it should be enough to let you know what the tool is, what it can do, and if it’s worth your time looking into and learning more about.

5_in_5This episode features the following tools:

  1. Big Huge Labs
  2. Kahoot!
  3. Pinterest
  4. Visuwords
  5. Piktochart

For the videos, the Prezis, Diigo links to all the sites featured in the episodes and more, visit my website. If you don’t want to miss another episode, subscribe to the iTunes podcast channel here.

Tech To You Later!
Katie

Facilitating PD in my PJs: Moderating my First Twitter Chat

Tonight I had the pleasure of moderating my first Twitter chat: #1to1techat (1:1 teacher chat).  This has been my favorite Twitter chat, professional development, and weekly motivation for a long time now.  I was flattered when Shaelynn Farnsworth asked me if I wanted to moderate this week.

You can check out the archive of #1to1techat on 2/19 by clicking here.

Before I answered her, I got very nervous. What if I didn’t have a good answer to someone’s question? It only took me a few minutes to calm down and realize, she wasn’t asking me to be an expert at anything.  The beauty of a Twitter chat is that it is a bunch of educators and practitioners coming together to exchange their expertise, brainstorm and bounce ideas off one another. I’m sure someone learned a thing or two from me, but I bet I learned the most from everyone else!

If you’ve participated in a Twitter chat before, you get the benefits.  If not, don’t worry-they happen every week day, so you have time to see it for yourself.

#1to1techatA Twitter chat is the easiest, most affordable (free!) and convenient way to connect with other educators across your state, the country, and even the world.  You use a program like TweetDeck, or even the Twitter search feature, and follow the chat by setting up a column (or searching) the designated hashtag (in this case, it was #1to1techat) at a specific time.  They usually last an hour.  A moderator poses questions to facilitate the conversation, and you- as a participant- include the designated hashtag in all tweets to keep it in the stream for others to see and respond to.  Twitter chats are like the best faculty room/hallway conversations and brain storm session you’ve ever had… on steroids!

“…until you look at Twitter, you won’t realize the sheer volume of conversations that are happening without you… It was kind of scary and awe-inspiring at the same time: the education world had been going on without us, and it was going really fast.”
Jody Passanisi and Shara Peters

Some Tips for Moderators and Things I Learned Along the Way:

  • I invited some individuals, (Twitter) lists of people, and  other common hashtags/chats to join us. The more people that are involved-the more fulfilling the conversations!
  • I had my questions pre-typed and double checked for the 140 character limit. This made it a lot easier to copy & paste the questions from a Google Doc (which I was also able to easily share with Shaelynn for feedback prior to the chat).
  • I used TweetDeck on my Mac to keep track of everything going on during this fast paced chat. I had multiple columns dedicated to the chat based on replays, RTs, favorites, etc.
  • I kept a notepad and pen near by to jot down any new tools, sites and go-to gurus that I want to investigate after the chat. HAH! I did not write one thing down because I didn’t have time. I’ll have to go back through and re-read the tweets and check out the archive.
  • Chats go fast and it’s easy to lose track of which question you’re on or what the question is.  After participating in #NTchat (new teacher chat-another inspiring chat) a couple of times, I borrowed Lisa Dabbs idea of pointing out the question as the moderator like so,
    —>Q1: question here. #hashtag.”
  • As hard as it will be, pay attention to time. I got caught up in conversations and didn’t leave as much time for some questions as I’d have liked.

Overall, I’d say it went pretty well. Well after the hour was up, people hung around to keep talking and sharing ideas (no thanks to me, but rather the people who participated and shared their experiences and ideas). When is the last time you were a part of “sit & get” PD where teachers weren’t looking at the clocks and ready to race out the second it was over? When was the last time people were actually bummed PD was over already?!  All of these people will continue to check out the ideas and tools shared on Twitter and implement them into their own classrooms to improve their instruction/facilitation.

This is the power of twitter chats, my friends!

Have you participated in a Twitter chat before? What did you think? What tips do you have for moderators?  What are some of your favorite Twitter chats?

Tech To You Later!
-Katie

13 Best Multi-Platform EdTech Tools of 2013

13 best edtech tools of 2013It’s the time of year for ‘Best Of 2013’ lists, so I thought I’d create my own.  This list contains the 13 best multi-platform (web, iOS, Android, etc.) apps and sites for the classroom (in my opinion).  Whether you’re a BYOT, 1:1 iPad, 1:1 Chromebook,  1:1 something else, or still convincing the movers and shakers in your building to switch to a BYO or 1:1 program, you’ll be able to use all 13 of these sites with your students!

13: YouTube: With over 6 billion hours of video being watched from the site every month, there is no explanation needed for the video sharing giant.  However, it is worth putting on this list for many reasons.  You can enrich your classroom with TED talks, Kahn academy videos, and much, much more coming from YouTube. Your students can upload and share their own video creations to reach a much broader audience than the 20-30 kids in your class. It goes without saying that YouTube has become a very powerful tool in education.

12: Skype: Has your field trip funding been cut? Bringing in a guest speaker not feasible because of the cost and distance?  Then give Skype a try! Skype has literally removed the walls, roads, mountains and oceans from our classrooms. Your students can now connect, face to face with anyone in the world. Their website has a lot of lesson ideas, volunteer guest speakers, and more.  Check out PD I did with my teachers about Skype here.

11: Evernote: Evernote is like having every notebook you’ve ever created, every idea you’ve jotted down, and every resource you’ve collected with you at all times.  You can share notebooks you’ve created with other people to view or collaborate with you.  You can snip webpages, upload photos and so much more.  Their enterprise has expanded to additional apps to make Evernote even more powerful, and they’re even making hardware now.  Evernote kept me organized as a varsity cheerleading coach. You’ll never run out of uses for Evernote.

10: Linoit: Always coming up with new ideas on the go? Looking for a space where your students can collaborate and brainstorm? Then Linoit may be just what you need!  Linoit is an online bulletin board that you can keep private or share with others to collaborate with you.  You can post stickies, photos, videos, documents and even post to your boards via email. To create a board, you will need an account, but (depending on your settings) you can allow your students to post to the board without an account- one less password to remember! Check out PD I did with my teachers about Linoit here.

9: StudyBlue: These online flashcards will help your students study & produce less paper waste! Based on the flash cards you create, or use from the millions of other sets already uploaded, study blue will quiz you and give you progress reports and feedback.  It syncs with Evernote and you can collaborate and share your set of flash cards with others.

8: NearPod: With all this talk of flipping the classroom, making classrooms student centered as opposed to teacher centered, I think some teachers get the idea that people expect them to remove all lecture from their classrooms.  While I agree with making our teaching more student centered, I think there is still a need in each classroom for some good old lecture sometimes.  NearPod takes those traditional boring, dis-engaged PowerPoint lectures and turns them into a whole new experience for kids.  You control what slide your students see and there are many different activities you can embed in the presentation for formative assessment.

7: TodaysMeet: This backchannel is a great way to answer questions, or better yet, have students answer other students questions (or teachers answer other teachers questions during PD), without interrupting the entire room.  It allows you to continue flowing with your lesson without leaving others behind who may be confused about something.  It has also become a powerful tool used at conferences. There is no app for iOS and Android as of now, but the mobile web version still functions on those devices.

6: InfuseLearning: Talk about a formative assessment revolution! InfuseLearning is similar to Socrative; there are a number of different question types you can use with your students throughout a lesson.  Teachers need an account to create and save their questions ahead of time, but students do not need an account! They simply use an access code to get to your questions. The reason I like InfuseLearning more than Socrative is the draw feature (at least at the time this post was written, Socrative did not have this feature to my knowledge). Once you’re finished with the lesson, you can download students’ responses for immediate feedback on your lesson and their understanding.

5: WordPress: This is a powerful, free, blogging platform with many different privacy settings to keep your students’ thoughts as private or as public as you want them to be.  Blogging is an incredible way for students to practice their writing skills, collaborate with other students, connect to others outside of the building, and really begin to take their writing seriously.  One of the teachers at my school has really done some incredible things with WordPress and class blogs. Even if you’re not ready to take the step to get your students blogging (I promise it’s not as tough as it may seem.  Here are some resources to get you started!), I would highly recommend blogging yourself.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve done, remember what worked & what you need to change this time next year, and share resources and ideas with other educators.  Don’t keep all those great things you’re doing in your class to yourself!

4. WeVideo: This video editor makes it easy for students to upload, edit and share impressive videos.

3: Google Drive: This list would be nothing if it didn’t contain Google Drive and Docs, Spreadsheets, Presentations and Forms. The Drive allows you to upload and share documents with anyone in the world.  Docs, Spreadsheets and  Presentations allow your students to create, share and collaborate with others on their work. Group activities, peer editing, and collaborative work takes on a whole new meaning with Google Drive apps.  Forms allow you to create surveys, quizzes, collect contact information and more very easily, and it automatically puts the responses in a Google Spreadsheet to easily analyze the information.  I couldn’t say enough positive things about these innovative tools.  Check out PD I did with my teachers about Google Drive and Apps here.

2. Twitter: Who would have ever thought 140 character thoughts would become such an important part of the education process? Whether you use it with your students or not, you’ve GOT to get on Twitter and start connecting with other educators for yourself! I’ve learned more and gotten more ideas from my PLN on Twitter than any single undergraduate and graduate course or school provided PD session. The real power of Twitter comes from weekly chats, where educators come together on the same day/time every week using a #hashtag. It’s now, it’s immediate, it’s relevant, it’s people who are experiencing the same things as you, it’s easy and it’s free. Read about the PD I put on for my teachers here. For a list of my Twitter resources, click here.

1. Schoology: I picked Schoology as the number one, multi-platform edtech tool because of it’s versatility.  In one place, you can organize your classroom with the easy to use LMS, have online discussions with your students, collect and grade work from students, create and grade with rubrics, give tests & quizzes and receive immediate data about students’ performance, reward students with badges, and SO much more!  I very much prefer Schoology to Edmodo for a number of reasons, click here to read why. Schoology brings a whole new element to your classroom!

So there you go- there’s my top 13 multi-platform edtech tools of 2013 list! What multi-platform tools would you add to the list?

Happy Holidays!

Tech To You Later!
Katie

Backwards EdTech Flow Chart

I’m a very visual person, so naturally I’m drawn to charts, diagrams and anything that I can look at and understand.  I’ve made a couple other charts to help people pick technology tools based on Bloom’s Taxonomy and web tools by category.  I’m particularly proud of this new chart that I’ve been working on for quite some time!

Backwards EdTech Flow Chart

Click this image for the full version!

I truly believe technology enhances the classroom, but I never think it should be used just for the sake of using it.  This is another visual I created to help teachers select the right technology tool for the job. I hope it helps you think backwards (or rather the “right” way) to think about selecting a technology tool to use in your class.

It starts by asking what you want students to do, and then you pick a goal, such as explain a concept.  Follow the diagram until you either reach a list of tech tools to help you or your students complete this task or you reach a prompting question, such as “do you need them to do this verbally?” Based on your yes or no answer, you’ll finally come to a list of edtech tools.  All the tools found on the web are hyperlinked.

If you’re not a visual person like myself, scroll to the second page that is just a list of the goals  and all the corresponding links (no prompting questions).

For this, the Bloom’s and the web 2.0 by category chart, visit my website!

What tools or goals would you add to the chart?

Tech To You Later!
Katie

10 Reasons I Prefer Schoology Over Edmodo

Recently, our school purchased Schoology’s Enterprise pack to replace our previous (outdated) LMS.  Obviously I am a fan of Schoology since I was a champion for the switch.

schoology logo

Through grad school classes and my own explorations, I have had a fair amount of experience with Edmodo too.  I see so many articles and tweets surrounding Edmodo, that I can’t help but feel like maybe people just don’t know about Schoology. Let me first say, that while I clearly prefer Schoology over Edmodo, I still think Edmodo is an awesome free resource for teachers!

Below are 10 reasons why I think Schoology is a better option than Edmodo.edmodo logo

1. It’s FREE!  Ok, so they both are free, but I think it’s important to point out that Schoology has an awesome free version too. You do have the option to pay for the enterprise package for the entire school and get even more awesome features (school wide analytics, single sign on, etc.).  The free version still offers plenty of incredible features for the independent teacher.

2. Ability to easily create folders inside of folders.  I am someone who puts a folder inside a folder inside a folder, so this is a huge deal breaker for me.

3. In Schoology, you can reorganize any folder and any item within a folder at any point.  In Edmodo, you have to be very careful to plan ahead and pick the exact order you want everything to appear because you cannot reorder.  If you can reorder items and folders in Edmodo, it is not very easy to figure it out … I still haven’t.

Student completion rules in Schoology4. Student completion rules.  This is one of my favorite features.  You can set any item within a folder to meet a certain requirement before the student is allowed to move on to the next thing.  You can set it to force the students to view an item, post a comment/reply,  make a submission or obtain a minimum score before they can view the next item in the list.

5. Discussion boards.  This is another one of my favorite features- they are awesome! You can easily grade comments and replys by student.  Both teachers and students are also able to embed media (files, links, audio/video recordings) in the discussion board comments.  Teachers can also require students to post their own comment before they will be able to see other students’ responses. I could go on about even more features with the discussion boards, but I’ll let you check it out!

6. Gradebook allows you to drop lowest score(s). You can also get to the gradebook for any of your classes within the gradebook view.

7. Student and course analytics are more detailed and easier to get to in Schoology.

8. Grade assignments/documents without leaving Schoology.  A student can attach any document to turn in an assignment and the teacher is able to grade it without leaving Schoology, using the Schoology dropbox.  Along these lines, you can grade by student or by question when grading assignments and quizzes.

9. Intuitive interface.  This is personal preference, but I think Schoology’s interface is much easier to navigate than Edmodo without any training.

10. Rubrics.  Schoology has enabled rubrics for grading. You can use a generic rubric or create a new rubric for each assignment and it will automatically populate when grading the assignment.

I think it is important to point out a few of the features that Schoology and Edmodo have in common.

  • Sync your Google account with Schoology to import your Google Docs.
  • Send updates, post assignments and create a poll from both the home page and within each course.
  • Reward students with badges.  You can choose from pre-created badges and/or create your own.
  • Parent accounts are also available for both.
  • iOS and Android apps are available.

Check out this video for a full overview of Schoology features.

Which free LMS do you prefer and why?  I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Tech To You Later!
-Katie